How JAM Does #GivingTuesday

 JAM team member Deb Pleva loves being involved with Girls on the Run and will be coaching her daughter’s team this spring! Photo courtesy of  Girls on the Run .

JAM team member Deb Pleva loves being involved with Girls on the Run and will be coaching her daughter’s team this spring! Photo courtesy of Girls on the Run.

What is #GivingTuesday?

Started as a way to kick off the season of giving and charity, #GivingTuesday falls after one of the biggest consumer shopping days of the year: Cyber Monday. Now in it’s 7th year, #GivingTuesday encourages people to give their money, time and energy to give back to organizations that are in need of good.

This year at JAM, #GivingTuesday has been an exciting and interesting topic of discussion. We all love to give back in our own ways and it’s been a pleasure learning from each other. These are just some of the organizations we are supporting this year:

 A Texas retreat. Courtesy of Casting for Recovery.

A Texas retreat. Courtesy of Casting for Recovery.

Casting for Recovery

Based out of team member Amy May’s hometown of Bozeman, MT, Casting for Recovery puts on free fly fishing retreats to aid in healing of the mind and body for women with breast cancer. They offer over 60 retreats across the country and serve around 800 women each year.

“As a fly fisherman and someone with many women in my life who have been touched by breast cancer, CFR means a lot to me. I believe in the restorative qualities of nature and rivers in particular and I love any organization that gets women outdoors. We’ve been able to support CFR fundraising efforts via donations from our clients.  And of course, I love getting to see the good work they do so close to my home in Bozeman Montana.” - Amy May Breitmaier, Public Relations

Follow Casting For Recovery on Instagram.

 
 A trail crew living and working in national parks during the summer. Courtesy of Eastern Sierra CC.

A trail crew living and working in national parks during the summer. Courtesy of Eastern Sierra CC.

Eastern Sierra Conservation Corps

ESCC provides programs for youth and young adults to experience and better understand the wilderness and our country’s natural resources. Their programs focus on priority populations and offer opportunities to learn about conservation, sustainability issues, history, geology, wilderness ethics, Leave No Trace principles, backpacking, trial stewardship and more.

“This is literally a boots on the ground organization that provides opportunities for youth and young adults from populations that have traditionally been underrepresented in our National Parks and Forests. “ - Julie Atherton, Founder

See more from Eastern Sierra Conservation Corps on Instagram.

 
 A “Moment of Happy” where every girl at an ashram or shelter receives her new bike. Photo courtesy of 88bikes.

A “Moment of Happy” where every girl at an ashram or shelter receives her new bike. Photo courtesy of 88bikes.

88bikes

88bikes helps provide girls with bikes all over the world, but especially those who have survived human trafficking. Donors from around the world give a simple donation, most often $88, and are connected with the young girl they have helped provide a bike for. Bikes are bought, distributed and repaired locally to infuse capital into the local economy.

“Bikes equal freedom and empowerment for these girls, and give them such joy and self-confidence. My family - who loves biking - has sponsored a couple of bikes, and we love getting a photo of them with their new bike, plus the photo of us that gets delivered with the bike. It’s a great way to connect with girls around the world, and to directly help them.” - Amy Hunter, Public Relations

Follow along with 88bikes via Instagram.

 
 Fork & Spoon Homestyle Kitchen in Bozeman, MT. Delicious, homegrown meals everyone can afford. Photo courtesy of Fork & Spoon Homestyle Kitchen.

Fork & Spoon Homestyle Kitchen in Bozeman, MT. Delicious, homegrown meals everyone can afford. Photo courtesy of Fork & Spoon Homestyle Kitchen.

Fork & Spoon Homestyle Kitchen

Based in Bozeman, Fork & Spoon is Montana’s first pay-what-you-can restaurant. Their focus is on inclusivity, and doesn’t inhibit anyone from having a homegrown, locally sourced meal just based on their ability to pay.

"It's a really nice environment and inclusive of all economic situations. If families can't pay anything, they don't need to, others will come in and pay over the recommended cost. It's a beautiful balance. The venue also holds a lot of free community events to bring everyone together. The cafe runs completely on volunteers with the exception of 2 full-time managers. My husband and I volunteer there 1x a month and it's such a great way to give back and see all the beautiful faces of our community over a nice warm meal.” - Kelsey McGrew, Public Relations

Follow Fork & Spoon Homestyle Kitchen on Instagram to see what they’re cooking in their neighborhood.

 

Through running, Girls On The Run strives to inspire young girls to pursue lifelong health and fitness and build confidence through accomplish. GOTR meets twice a week in small teams, teaching life skills through running games and interactive lessons.

“Girls’ self confidence plummets during the tween and early teen years. I’ve witnessed this with my own 11-year-old daughter. I’m excited to serve as a running coach for a team this spring and show her and her teammates how to feel great about themselves through physical activity and developing critical life skills. Plus, I was just invited to join their international board of directors which is quite an honor.” - Deborah Pleva, Public Relations

See more of what Girls On The Run does for young girls via Instagram.

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society and the American Cancer Society

 Raising funds during Relay for Life, the signature event of the American Cancer Society. Photo courtesy of  Relay for Life.

Raising funds during Relay for Life, the signature event of the American Cancer Society. Photo courtesy of Relay for Life.

Cancer is one disease that unfortunately affects almost everyone, whether it be a personal battle or through a family member. The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society and the American Cancer Society are two organizations raising funds for research, finding cures and helping patients with treatments.

“One of my daughter’s best friends was diagnosed with Leukemia when she was five years old.  She is a healthy, 16-year-old now thanks to the treatment she received.  In fact, I just got an email from LLS in regards to National Family Caregivers Month - it’s a time to “shine a light on all those who selflessly provide care and support to their loved ones”.  I will be giving in honor of Kirsten’s friend, Jordan, and her mom, Eris. And I cannot forget the American Cancer Society…this I give to because my Dad was diagnosed with brain cancer when he was 55 and I was in college.”  - Karen Whetstone

Check out the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society and the American Cancer Society on Instagram.

 
 In-school, after-school and summer programs for K-12 put on by Mission Graduates makes college the norm in San Francisco’s Mission District. Photo courtesy of Mission Graduates.

In-school, after-school and summer programs for K-12 put on by Mission Graduates makes college the norm in San Francisco’s Mission District. Photo courtesy of Mission Graduates.

Mission Graduates

Through programs put on after school, during school and over the summer, Mission Graduates strives to make college the expectation for youth in San Francisco’s Mission District. Each year their programs reach more than 3,100 low-income children, youth and families.

“This organization is near and dear to my heart because it directly impacts kids right in my neighborhood.” - Julie Campagnoli, Public Relations

See the latest impact Mission Graduates is making in San Francisco by following them on Instagram.

 

Oregon Natural Desert Association

Based in Bend, Oregon, the Oregon Natural Desert Association is committed to educating and teaching people about the desert in hopes of encouraging them to take steps to conserve public lands.

“I was searching one summer when I signed my 15 year old son Rex and myself up to participate with 10 other volunteers in a "fence pull" through Oregon Natural Desert Association . I was hoping the notion of “saving” wild animals from grisly barb wire fates would light a kind of hero spark in him, open communication between the two of us and inspire this city kid to bond with the natural world and find his natural state. And it worked.  Rex felt great about “saving” wild animals (“girls will love that”), he chatted and teased with me, and I smiled when he pointed out beautiful vistas, wildflowers and landscapes. But something else happened.  I watched as Rex fell in with the other males in the group. Without much dialogue they gave him direction, praise, teased and joked- took him under their collective wing.   My heart swelled as I watched Rex become one of them, one of a group of men working together for a higher purpose.” - Darcy Hagin 

 
 Sorting groceries is a huge task when you prepare 2,500 daily meals. Photo courtesy of Project Open Hand.

Sorting groceries is a huge task when you prepare 2,500 daily meals. Photo courtesy of Project Open Hand.

Project Open Hand

Starting in 1985, Ruth Brinker, a loving grandmother and retired food-service worker, saw a need for homemade meals to nourish those suffering from the AIDS epidemic at the time. After an increase in requests for home-delivered meals, Ruth recruited volunteers and Project Open Hand has expanded to prepare 2,500 meals daily to people fighting HIV/AIDS, fighting cancer, heart disease, diabetes and other serious illnesses.

“My personal connection to this organization began in 1991 when my father began volunteering to do meal and grocery delivery in East Oakland to POH clients living with HIV/AIDS. He brought our entire family to do deliveries when possible. Being a child and having the opportunity to interact with the folks on our route every Friday evening profoundly shaped my perspective on community and service. I can’t overemphasize how devastating HIV/AIDS was at that time in the Bay Area, and it was wrenching as a child to have a client I’d spoken with the week before suddenly be gone from our delivery route because they’d passed away. But most of my memories from the years we volunteered with Project Open Hand are of the smells of good food, smiling faces, laughing with the clients on our route and being warmly welcomed into their homes. I am so grateful that my first experience volunteering was for Project Open Hand, and I am appreciative that they have expanded their services to continue to serve food with love in the greater Bay Area.” - Sara Murphy, Social Media

Follow more of Project Open Hand’s life-changing work on Instagram.

 

Send It Foundation

Jamie Schou was diagnosed in 2012 with a rare and aggressive form of cancer, Synovial Sarcoma. For the next two years, he vowed to turn “someday” into “today” by spending his breaks from chemotherapy biking, skiing, hiking and paddling. Jamie created the Send It Foundation in his final year of life to provide outdoor adventures and community to those fighting cancer.

“Send It was started by a close friend of mine who was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer and fought it with such bravery and grace until he passed away in 2014.  His sisters and family have made certain it has continued – to fulfill Jamie’s intention of helping young adult cancer fighters get out into nature, live, and connect to fuel their fight.  I initially managed their brand awareness through outreach events and fundraisers.” - July Zaleski, Public Relations

 
 Human trafficking survivors create necklaces and braceletes at the She Has Hope Rehabilitation Center. Photo courtesy of She Has Hope.

Human trafficking survivors create necklaces and braceletes at the She Has Hope Rehabilitation Center. Photo courtesy of She Has Hope.

She Has Hope

Starting in 2012 as a result of the alarming amount of Nepali women going missing, She Has Hope works on initiatives surrounding the prevention, rescue and rehabilitation of human trafficking victims around the world. Through prevention campaigns, safe centers, counseling, skill training and more, this organization hopes to leave everyone they work with with a renewed sense of hope.

“They have conducted hundreds of trafficking awareness campaigns, training thousands of susceptible Nepali girls to avoid the false promises and deceptive offers of traffickers. The Co-Founder is an incredible humanitarian and my dear angel friend Kirby Trapolino. I plan on going to Nepal to volunteer.” - Janete Rodas, Public Relations

See the work She Has Hope is doing on Instagram.

 
 Courtesy of Snowdays Foundation

Courtesy of Snowdays Foundation

Snowdays Foundation

Based in Portland, Oregon, Snowdays Foundation focuses on teaching snowboarding to middle and high schoolers in underserved neighborhoods to help students gain self-confidence, strengthen friendships and gain and understanding and appreciation for Oregon’s natural environments. This year, your donation will go twice as far with evo matching all donations before January 1st!

“It’s a reminder of the way that sometimes making the world a better place can start with the simple act of sharing something that you love. Also, snowboarding kept me out of trouble as a teenager, and helped shape my rebellious spirit into something productive. I love to see the way that sports and being in nature can make a mark on someone’s life and create direction where it did not exist before.” - Rian Rhoe, Public Relations 

See what’s happening at Snowdays Foundation this season on Instagram.